PPP and COVID-19 Tax Updates and Information

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Important Tax Changes for Individuals and Businesses

Posted on January 5th, 2021

Every year, it’s a sure bet that there will be changes to current tax law and this year is no different. From standard deductions to health savings accounts and tax rate schedules, here’s a checklist of tax changes to help you plan the year ahead. Read More…

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Standard Mileage Rates for 2021

Posted on January 4th, 2021

Starting January 1, 2021, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car, van, pickup, or panel truck are as follows: Read More…

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COVID-19 Tax News

PPP Round 2: What You Need to Know to Cash In

Posted on January 4th, 2021

The new tax law just signed by President Trump has significantly changed the current Paycheck Protection Program. 

Most importantly, it provides a second round of additional PPP loan funding.

Here are the key changes — from forgiveness to the requirements for new PPP funding. Read More…

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Identity Protection Pin Available To All Taxpayers

Posted on January 4th, 2021

Starting in January 2021, the IRS Identity Protection PIN Opt-In Program will be expanded to all taxpayers who can properly verify their identity. Previously, IP PINs were only available to identity theft victims. Read More…

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What is the Excise Tax? Taxable Goods and Services

Posted on January 3rd, 2021

An excise tax is a tax that is generally imposed on the sale of specific goods or services, or on certain uses. Examples of things a federal excise tax is usually imposed on include the sale of fuel, airline tickets, heavy trucks and highway tractors, indoor tanning, tires, and tobacco, as well as other goods and services. Excise taxes are imposed on a wide variety of goods, services, and activities and may be imposed at the time of: Read More…

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Covid-Related Tax Relief Act of 2020

Posted on January 2nd, 2021

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, H.R. 133 included funding for the government, extensions for expiring tax extenders, COVID tax relief under the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, and many more items. Passed by both the House and Senate, it was signed into law by President Trump on December 27, 2020. Read More…

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Tax Due Dates 2021

Tax Due Dates for January 2021

Posted on January 1st, 2021

During January

All employers – Give your employees their copies of Form W-2 for 2020 by February 1, 2021. If an employee agreed to receive Form W-2 electronically, post it on a website accessible to the employee and notify the employee of the posting by February 1. Read More…

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Individual Taxpayers: Recap for 2020

Posted on December 9th, 2020

As we close out the year and get ready for tax season, here’s what individuals and families need to know about tax provisions for 2020.

Personal Exemptions
Personal exemptions are eliminated for tax years 2018 through 2025.

Standard Deductions
The standard deduction for married couples filing a joint return in 2020 is $24,800. For singles and married individuals filing separately, it is $12,400, and for heads of household, the deduction is $18,650.

The additional standard deduction for blind people and senior citizens in 2020 is $1,300 for married individuals and $1,650 for singles and heads of household. Read More…

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Retirement Contributions Limits Announced for 2021

Posted on December 8th, 2020

Cost of living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for 2021 are as follows:

401(k), 403(b), 457 plans, and Thrift Savings Plan. Contribution limits for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan remains unchanged at $19,500. The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over remains unchanged at $6,500.

SIMPLE retirement accounts. Contribution limits for SIMPLE retirement accounts for self-employed persons remains unchanged in 2021 as well at $13,500.

Traditional IRAs. The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains at $6,000. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000.

Taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions; however, if during the year either the taxpayer or their spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. If a retirement plan at work covers neither the taxpayer nor their spouse, the phase-out amounts of the deduction do not apply.

The phase-out ranges for 2021 are as follows:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $66,000 to $76,000, up from $65,000 to $54,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where a workplace retirement plan covers the spouse making the IRA contribution, the phase-out range is $105,000 to $125,000, up from $104,000 to $124,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $198,000 and $208,000, up from $196,000 and $206,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

Roth IRAs. The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $125,000 to $140,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $124,000 to $139,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $198,000 to $208,000, up from $196,000 to $206,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

Saver’s Credit. The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low and moderate-income workers is $66,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $65,000; $49,500 for heads of household, up from $48,750; and $33,000 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $32,500.

If you have any questions about retirement plan contributions, don’t hesitate to call.

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Business Tax Provisions: The Year in Review

Posted on December 6th, 2020

Here’s what business owners need to know about tax changes for 2020.

Standard Mileage Rates
The standard mileage rate in 2020 is 57.5 cents per business mile driven.

Health Care Tax Credit for Small Businesses
Small business employers who pay at least half the premiums for single health insurance coverage for their employees may be eligible for the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit as long as they employ fewer than the equivalent of 25 full-time workers and average annual wages do not exceed $50,000 (adjusted annually for inflation). This amount is $55,200 for 2020 returns. Read More…

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Solar Technology Tax Credits Still Available for 2020

Posted on December 6th, 2020

Certain energy-efficient home improvements can cut your energy bills and save you money at tax time. While many of these tax credits expired at the end of 2016, tax credits for residential and non-business energy-efficient solar technologies do not expire until December 31, 2021. Here are some key facts that you should know about these tax credits: Read More…

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Working Remotely Could Affect Your Taxes

Posted on December 5th, 2020

When COVID-19 struck last March, employers quickly switched to a work-from-home model for their employees, many of whom began working in a state other than the one in which their office was located. While some workers have returned to their offices, many have not. If you’re working remotely from a location in a different state (or country) from that of your office, then you may be wondering if you will have to pay income tax in multiple jurisdictions or whether you will need to file income tax returns in both states. Read More…

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Small Business: Deductions for Charitable Giving

Posted on December 3rd, 2020

Tax breaks for charitable giving aren’t limited to individuals, your small business can benefit as well. If you own a small to medium-sized business and are committed to giving back to the community through charitable giving, here’s what you should know. Read More…

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Tax Due Dates 2021

Tax Due Dates for December 2020

Posted on December 1st, 2020

December 10

Employees who work for tips – If you received $20 or more in tips during November, report them to your employer. You can use Form 4070.

December 15

Corporations – Deposit the fourth installment of estimated income tax for 2020. A worksheet, Form 1120-W, is available to help you estimate your tax for the year.

Employers Social Security, Medicare, and withheld income tax – If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

Employers Nonpayroll withholding – If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in November.

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Charitable Donation Deduction Could Lower Your Tax Bill

Posted on December 1st, 2020

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, enacted last spring, includes several temporary tax changes that help charitable organizations. One such provision allows taxpayers to deduct cash donations of up to $300 made before December 31, 2020.

Designed especially for people who choose to take the standard deduction, rather than itemize. In tax-year 2018, the most recent year for which complete figures are available, more than 134 million taxpayers claimed the standard deduction, just over 87percent of all filers. Read More…

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